Posted 5 days ago
We should care about scientific misconduct because it damages society’s confidence in science, despite the fact that science is the basis for so much medical progress, technological innovation and economic prosperity. Such damage gives traction to climate change deniers, creationists, homeopaths and many other quacks, as well as weakening the financial support for science from the public purse. While the high-profile cases inflict major damage on public perceptions, all sorts of misconduct undermine scientists’ trust in the literature that forms the basis for research progress.
Posted 1 week ago
jtotheizzoe:

chels:

A fish slingshot for helping our finned friends get over dams is now being tested in the wild: 

"Originally designed for fruit, Whooshh turned its technology into a tool to help safely send fish over dams blocking the course on the Columbia river in Washington state. Under tests right now with the Department of Energy and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Whooshh tubes could be shooting more fish over dams in the near future. A test this past summer showed that fish will voluntarily enter the tube. When they swim into the entrance, the vacuum sucks them in and gives them initial boost; after that, elevated pressure behind the fish keeps them moving at about 15 to 22 miles per hour till they go flying out the other end."

You can watch a whole video about how this crazy fish cannon works, or read more about it here. 
(Via Alexis Madrigal’s 5 Intriguing Things newsletter)

We are mighty.

jtotheizzoe:

chels:

A fish slingshot for helping our finned friends get over dams is now being tested in the wild: 

"Originally designed for fruit, Whooshh turned its technology into a tool to help safely send fish over dams blocking the course on the Columbia river in Washington state. Under tests right now with the Department of Energy and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Whooshh tubes could be shooting more fish over dams in the near future. A test this past summer showed that fish will voluntarily enter the tube. When they swim into the entrance, the vacuum sucks them in and gives them initial boost; after that, elevated pressure behind the fish keeps them moving at about 15 to 22 miles per hour till they go flying out the other end."

You can watch a whole video about how this crazy fish cannon works, or read more about it here

(Via Alexis Madrigal’s 5 Intriguing Things newsletter)

We are mighty.

Posted 1 week ago
thepacificparrotlet:

wordsonbirds:

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.
The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so they have to come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

This is absolutely fascinating. It seems so obvious that the beak would be a good way to radiate heat out, but I’d never even thought of that.

That is awesome!

thepacificparrotlet:

wordsonbirds:

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.

The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so they have to come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

This is absolutely fascinating. It seems so obvious that the beak would be a good way to radiate heat out, but I’d never even thought of that.

That is awesome!

Posted 2 weeks ago

plant-a-day:

Sensitive Plant

Mimosa pudica

"Pudica" is the Latin word for "shy" or "bashful," which is an apt description of the sensitive "Touch-Me-Not." Native to South and Central America, this shade-lover often grows as a weed under trees and shrubs. It is popular among collectors as a specimen plant worldwide, because of its unique sensitivity to touch.

The foliage retracts when touched to prevent consumption by herbivores, and it also exhibits nyctinastic movement, meaning circadian rhythms affect the leaves to close at night, and re-open during the day. 

This trait is present in many other members of the legume family as well.

You can buy seeds for this plant and grow it yourself:

Canada / USA / UK & Europe / Worldwide

——

- biodiverseed

Posted 3 weeks ago
Posted 4 weeks ago

astrodidact:

This Tree Is Growing 40 Different Kinds Of Fruit At Once

This single (and quite colorfully blossoming) tree grows 40 different varieties of peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries, and even almonds — but just how does it do it?

It does it through the process of chip grafting. After sculptor Sam Van Aken bought a failing orchard in upstate New York full of hundreds of different fruit trees, he began the pain-staking process of grafting several of the different varieties together into one tree. Six years later, the result is this 40-fruit bearing tree, which includes some heirloom varieties that are centuries old.

Image: Sam Van Aken

http://io9.com/this-tree-is-growing-40-different-kinds-of-fruit-at-onc-1608917128

Posted 1 month ago

sci-universe:

Each fall, millions of monarch butterflies migrate to California and Mexico for winter. North American monarchs are the only butterflies that make such a massive journey (up to 4,830 kilometers/3,000 miles). They use the sun to ensure that they stay on course and on cloudy days Earth’s magnetic field as a kind of backup navigational system. (read more here)

Posted 1 month ago

sploadygoat:

tehwhovianhufflepuff:

playmygayheartstrings:

fuckinglesbian:

just-a-skinny-boy:

Red hot nickel dropped in water…

I just yelled THAT’S SO FASCINATING

As well you should because THAT IS SERIOUSLY SO FASCINATING

THAT IS THE CUTEST NOISE I HAVE EVER HEARD

it’s like a tiny magical girl transformation scene

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

wtfevolution:

Sometimes evolution makes beautiful animals that move with all the elegance of a finely-honed ballet. Other times… it makes ducks.